Trial access: Biographisch-Bibliographisches Kirchenlexikon (BBKL)


The University of Cambridge has trial access on campus only to the Biographisch-Bibliographisches Kirchenlexikon (BBKL) to April 12, 2018.

The link to the trial is here:

We regret that we cannot provide off campus access to this resource.

Please send your feedback on the encyclopedia to  Thank you.

The BBKL is the largest ecclesiastical encyclopaedia worldwide, including more than 20.000 entries about deceased personalities of ecclesiastical history – in the area of theology, religion, philosophy, art history and related subjects.

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Sara Gallardo, recently rediscovered Argentine writer


Sara Gallardo (1931-1988). Image from Wikimedia Commons

This is a guest post by Jordana Blejmar (University of Liverpool) and Joanna Page (University of Cambridge). 

Sara Gallardo was born in Buenos Aires in 1931 to an aristocratic Catholic family, with illustrious antecedents such as General Bartolomé Mitre, the writer Miguel Cané, the politician and biologist Ángel Gallardo, all key figures in the constitution of the Argentine nation. Her striking and eclectic fiction has been recently ‘rediscovered’, and the University Library has acquired many of her most important works (see here).

Gallardo travelled extensively in Latin America, Europe and Asia, published five novels, one book of short stories, several chronicles and four books for children. Her love for literature started in childhood. She was constantly ill and spent several days in bed reading books that would later influence her writing, including adventure stories, animal fables and classic works by Walter Scott, Rudyard Kipling and others. In 1950 she became a journalist; in 1958, she published her first novel, Enero (UL classmark: 2016.7.388), the story of a humble maid working on an estancia (a ranch), who falls pregnant following a rape and considers having an abortion. Gallardo presents a portrait of the relationship between patrones and employees without sentimentalism or a patronising gaze, and deals sensitively with issues of prejudice and guilt. Continue reading

International Women’s Day

From Frauentag! Erfindung und Karriere einer Tradition

To commemorate International Women’s day today, and to follow up on the huge success of the University Library’s exhibition featuring women’s suffrage posters, in this blogpost we are going to showcase two diverse items that deal with the visual representation of women, their freedom, rights and role in society.

Frauentag! Erfindung und Karriere einer Tradition (C212.c.8465) was published in 2011 to accompany an exhibition entitled Feste. Kämpfe. 100 Jahre Frauentag, held at the Österreichisches Museum für Volkskunde. The exhibition marked 100 years since the first International Women’s Day was observed in 1911, when in Vienna women marched on the Ringstrasse, carrying banners. The exhibition (and book) focused in particular on the history of the women’s movement in Austria and included a whole section on the variety of posters relating to International Women’s Day. Continue reading

Pierre Boucher and New France


Portrait and signature of P. Boucher (from 662:3.c.95.10).

Pierre Boucher was born in Mortagne-au-Perche, France in 1622. When he was twelve, his family left to settle in New France (Canada). His father, Gaspard, worked for the Jesuits in Notre-Dame-des-Anges (Quebec) and they took care of the education of the children, especially Pierre. He was interested in the life of the native peoples and he became interpreter of Iroquoian languages, particularly Huron. He was a missionary assistant to the Jesuits in Huronia from 1637 to 1641.

Pierre Boucher, like New France pioneers Samuel de Champlain and Jean Talon, believed in miscegenation with the native peoples. Pierre married Marie-Madeleine Chrestienne (or Marie Ouebadinskoue) a Huron girl educated by the Ursulines, who later died in childbirth (1649) along with their child. In 1652 he married Jeanne Crevier, with whom he had fifteen children. From 1645 to 1667, he lived in the little settlement of Trois-Rivières (see View 1 below), founded in 1634 and second permanent settlement in New France after Quebec City. Boucher was twice-governor of Trois-Rivières (1653-58, 1662-67). Continue reading

Best wishes from Trotsky : the February 2018 Slavonic item of the month

Among the February 1918-related exhibits soon to be added to the University Library’s Revolution exhibition is a letter from Leon Trotsky.  The letter came to the Library as part of the papers of the Conservative politician, Sir Samuel John Gurney Hoare (1880-1959), second Baronet, and first and last Viscount Templewood.  Hoare was in Russia as an intelligence officer in 1916, and his interest in the country continued long after his departure.  Quite how this letter, which is dated 27 February 1918 and refers to the work of the agent Bruce Lockhart, came to be amongst Hoare’s papers is only one of its mysteries.

Templewood II:2(27)

Continue reading