Patron Driven Acquisition scheme for Italian ebooks: an update

We have been expanding our provision of Italian language ebooks in collaboration with our Italian suppliers. A couple of years ago we set up a facility whereby readers can recommend such titles for purchase, and as new ebook titles appear, we have been adding them to our database. There are now approximately 16,500 titles searchable in iDiscover. The scheme works in the following way:

Records for the entire Italian-language ebook content hosted on Casalini’s Torrossa platform are searchable in iDiscover. Each title is recognizable by a combination of two factors: Continue reading

The 1917 Russian Revolution, version 1.0

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Postcard showing a funeral procession for the February Revolution dead, on Nevsky Prospect. From the Catherine Cooke Collection.

One hundred years ago, Russia was in the grip of the February Revolution.  By the Revolution’s end, the Tsar and his government had been overthrown.  1917 had now seen the unthinkable happen, as hundreds of years of tsarist rule were overturned.  Yet this was just the beginning of a world-changing year.

First, a pedant’s note about months.  Many readers will know that the February and October Revolutions refer to the Julian calendar, and are what we usually refer to as dates in the “Old Style”.  In the Gregorian calendar (whose dates are “New Style”), the February Revolution took place in March and the October Revolution in November.  The names have, however, always stuck.  The Soviets formally adopted the Gregorian calendar in early 1918 but the Fevral’skaia revoliutsiia and Oktiabr’skaia revoliutsiia remained untouched.

While we normally write in this blog about books held by Cambridge, and while 1917-related UL material will certainly be studied in future posts, today’s post celebrates instead a freely available online initiative set up to mark the Russian centenary, the fascinating site 1917: svobodnaia istoriia (1917: free history): https://project1917.ru/  Designed specifically for a modern audience accustomed to real-time updates, the site covers the events of one hundred years ago, “as described by those involved … [using] only diaries, letters, memoirs, newspapers and other documents.”  Illustrated with photos, art, and newsreel footage from the time, 1917: svobodnaia istoriia is absolutely captivating and terrifyingly good at bringing extremely turbulent times to life.

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Journal of Austrian Studies

ejournals@cambridge

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Journal of Austrian Studies.

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From the journal website:

The Journal of Austrian Studies is an interdisciplinary quarterly that publishes scholarly articles and book reviews on all aspects of the history and culture of Austria, Austro-Hungary, and the Habsburg territory. It is the flagship publication of the Austrian Studies Association and contains contributions in German and English from the world’s premiere scholars in the field of Austrian studies. The journal highlights scholarly work that draws on innovative methodologies and new ways of viewing Austrian history and culture. Although the journal was renamed in 2012 to reflect the increasing scope and diversity of its scholarship, it has a long lineage dating back over a half century as Modern Austrian Literature and, prior to that, The Journal of the International Arthur Schnitzler Research Association.

The journal also offers book reviews, editorials and letters to the editor.

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Italian Culture

ejournals@cambridge

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Italian culture.

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From the Taylor & Francis website for the journal:

Italian Cultureis the official publication of the American Association for Italian Studies. Its interdisciplinary scope reflects the broad and diverse interests of the Association’s members, offering subscribers scholarly articles in Italian language, linguistics, history, literature, cinema, politics, philosophy, folklore, popular culture, migration, and the influence of Italy on other cultures. It also includes articles on comparative literature and cultural studies.

“Since 2003, the content of Italian Culture has run the gamut of Italian literature from “the Origins” through the Renaissance and Vico, to queer studies, feminist writing, film, and postcolonial women’s writing.

“Though  Italian Culturehas paid great attention to topics in modern and contemporary literature, this is by no means its exclusive focus. Italian Cultureis a multidisciplinary journal that features articles in other areas, such as politics, Italian Americana, cinema…

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