Trial access: BIZ Biblioteca Italiana Zanichelli

ejournals@cambridge

The University of Cambridge has trial access to the BIZ Biblioteca Italiana Zanichelli resource until 17 July 2018 via this link.

Access is available on or off campus but is restricted to 5 simultaneous users, so if you have finished your session please remember to exit your browser session.

You do not need to login, access to the  Biblioteca Italiana Zanichelli is enabled on the left of the platform under “Bookshelf”.

The BIZ (Italian Library Zanichelli) is an online collection of over 1,000 texts of Italian literature up  to the early decades of the twentieth century.

Please send your feedback on this trial to ejournals@lib.cam.ac.uk.  Thank you.

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Italian literary prizewinners for 2017-2018

We have customarily drawn attention to the major literary prizewinners in Italy, highlighting the winners of five important prizes. We last focused on the 2016 winners. Since our last blog post, those five major prizes have been awarded as follows:

The Strega prize: awarded in 2017 to Paolo Cognetti for his novel Le otto montagne (C213.c.429)

The Bagutta prize: awarded in 2017 to Vivian Lamarque for her novel Madre d’inverno (C205.d.4406) and in early 2018 to Helena Kaneczek for her novel La ragazza con la Leica (C213.c.6240) Continue reading

Collected works of Giordano Bruno

The University Library and ebooks@cambridge have recently purchased a full-text web-based Giordano Bruno collection, available on InteLex Past Masters.

Giordano Bruno, engraving by Johann Georg Mentzel (1677-1743) via Wikimedia Commons

Giordano Bruno, the Italian author and philosopher, was born in 1548 at Nola, near Naples, and baptised Filippo. He joined the Dominican friars of Naples in 1562, taking ‘Giordano’ (Jordan) as his religious name. His adventurous thinking brought him under suspicion of heresy in the increasingly authoritarian atmosphere of the Italian Counter-Reformation, and in 1576 he fled northwards, finding his way via Switzerland to France. He taught for a while in Paris, and in 1583 crossed the Channel to England where, among other things, he became acquainted with Sir Philip Sidney, and lectured on the Copernican theory at Oxford. Inevitably, his name has been associated with that of Shakespeare, but there is no solid evidence to connect them. Continue reading

Patron Driven Acquisition scheme for Italian ebooks: an update

We have been expanding our provision of Italian language ebooks in collaboration with our Italian suppliers. A couple of years ago we set up a facility whereby readers can recommend such titles for purchase, and as new ebook titles appear, we have been adding them to our database. There are now approximately 16,500 titles searchable in iDiscover. The scheme works in the following way:

Records for the entire Italian-language ebook content hosted on Casalini’s Torrossa platform are searchable in iDiscover. Each title is recognizable by a combination of two factors: Continue reading

Denis Mack Smith, 1920-2017

We were saddened to hear last week of the death of Denis Mack Smith, CBE FBA FRSL, considered to be the greatest English historian of modern Italy. Born on March 3, 1920, he wrote extensively on the history of Italy from the Risorgimento onwards and is best known for his works on Garibaldi, Cavour and Mussolini. He was honoured both in this country and abroad.  An emeritus fellow of All Souls College, Oxford, and an honorary fellow of Wolfson College, Oxford and of Peterhouse here in Cambridge, he was named Grand Official of the Order of Merit of the Italian Republic in 1996.

Here at the UL, in addition to our extensive holdings of his works, we have numerous items that were part of his personal library and which have been very generously passed on to us by the Bodleian. It has been a pleasure and privilege to unpack, sort and catalogue these items, and I have endeavoured to highlight some of them in past blog posts. Very poignantly, I heard the news of his death, on July 11 2017, whilst unpacking the latest consignment to arrive from Oxford. I shall treasure the opportunity to add these to our collections, and remain extremely grateful both to the Bodleian and to Denis Mack Smith for passing these on.

Bettina Rex