Ukraine and anti-war Russians in ‘Novaia Gazeta’

The first stanza of Bykov’s poem.

Subscribers to this blog will have seen a reblog earlier in the week from the CUL Electronic Collections Management site announcing access to the Russian-language newspaper Novaia Gazeta.

The Russian war against Ukraine was not only the focus of the paper in its final weeks in Russia before it closed but of course also the reason for its closure, as Russian governmental pressure relating to the so-called “special military operation” made it impossible for the newspaper to perform its duties properly.

The paper appears three times in our A-Z databases list (all three here) because East View, the platform via which we have access, provides the years 1994-2021 as a single digital archive, while providing access to the first few months of 2022 as another, and the new Europe edition as a third.  The Europe edition started in Riga in early May, while the last Russian edition appeared in late March, a few days before the atrocities committed in Bucha were revealed.  The latest horrors, including the torture of a Ukrainian POW, are now covered in the most recent Europe issue (but note that an ’18+’ tag is applied to articles with distressing images – take the warning seriously). Continue reading

New Europresse subscription: online access to French newspapers and magazines

After receiving very positive trial feedback and approval of the Library Accessions Committee, Cambridge University is now subscribing to the academic version of Europresse, an aggregator which allows online access to many French and Francophone national and regional newspapers and magazines including Le Monde (from 1944), Le Figaro, Libération, L’Humanité, Les Echos, La Tribune ; Le Soir, Le Temps ; Le Parisien, Ouest-France, La Provence ; L’Express, Le Point, Marianne, L’Obs, Le Monde diplomatique etc.

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BelgicaPress: online access to historical Belgian newspapers

Front page, 6-5-2015

Front page, 6-5-2015

The blog of the Bodleian History Faculty Library at Oxford has recently drawn our attention to a new service available through the Koninklijke Bibliotheek België:

On 24 April, the Koninklijke Bibliotheek België (Bibliothèque royale de Belgique, Royal Library of Belgium) launched BelgicaPress, an online resource providing access to nine digitised historical Belgium newspapers. Over 4 mill

ion pages have been digitised. They cover 1831 to 1950 for the following newspapers:

L’Echo De La Presse, Gazet Van Brussel, Het Handelsblad, L’Indépendance Belge (printed in Britain), Le Messager De Gand, De Nieuwe Gids, De Nieuwe Standaard and Het Nieuws Van Den Dag.

However, only content before 1919 is freely accessible over the internet. That is still an amazing 1.2 million pages and particularly good news for 19th century and World War I historians.

For a further explanation of how to use this service, please read more at their blog.

Newspapers, readers and the “managed public sphere” during the Soviet sixties

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A collage of newspaper titles from across the Soviet Union, shown in Leninskaia Pravda, item 4 in the list at the end of the post.

The third CamCREES seminar of the term saw Dr Simon Huxtable talk about the changing role of the newspaper in Soviet society.  Under Stalin, papers focused on official and ceremonial information; actual news had a relatively small and controlled role to play.  This changed hugely under Khrushchev, with the rise of the sobkor and analysis.

The Soviet newspaper before Khrushchev’s time did not fulfil the function that one might expect – the conveying of news was not its main concern.  Dr Huxtable quoted Lenin on the role of the paper: ‘The newspaper is not only a collective propagandist and collective agitator, but also a collective organiser’ (page 11 in volume 5 of our main Lenin set, 231.d.95.88). Continue reading